34th Annual Ohio Employee Ownership Conference update

Publications and Research

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First Class Mail delivery to domestic US addresses is included in price of book. (if outside the continental U.S. contact the OEOC for shipping information):

Tax (applicable to all Ohio orders): 7.25%

An Owner’s Guide to Business Succession Planning

A Book and DVD on business succession planning for small and medium-sized businesses. 2nd Edition (2008), Stephen Clifford, 64 pages with CD included Kent Popular Press

ISBN 978-0-933522-26-8 (paper), $20

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It used to be that family businesses were passed down in the family. But family size keeps dropping, and the average business owner’s children are far more likely to go to college and to become doctors and lawyers than in the past. While over half of business owners still want the business to stay in the family, data indicate that only 30 percent of family businesses will make it to the 2nd generation and only 15 percent to the 3rd.

Worse, only a minority of business owners over the age of 55 – 60 have actually formalized a succession plan. As a consequence, the failure to plan for business ownership succession is the number one preventable cause of job loss.

An Owner’s Guide to Business Succession Planning is a basic roadmap to assist owners of small and medium-sized businesses as they begin to plan for ownership and management succession. It offers a simple, six-step process that insures that the owner’s goals shape the actions taken and the plan’s outcome. The process also includes taking other stakeholders’ interests into consideration, evaluating management, testing various scenarios, understanding the options available and implementing the plan. The process is framed in terms of overarching choices about family and about legacy. These considerations, of course, shape the business owner’s choices.

The Owner’s Guide examines the tools available to business owners seeking to implement one or more of the choices discussed. Those tools include valuation of the business, keeping the business in the family, buy-sell agreements, gifting of shares, trusts, management buyouts, sale to the employees, sale to an outsider, and liquidation of the business. Again, the Owner’s Guide looks at some of the advantages and pitfalls of using these tools.

The Owner’s Guide also includes: (1) current tax information relevant to the choices that the business owner faces, (2) a bibliography, (3) succession planning worksheets which help the reader compile and organize information before and during the process and (4) a video in DVD format which is conveniently presented in seven succession planning subject segments and includes interviews with owners and employees of companies in transition.

Selling Your Business to Your Employees: Employee Stock Ownership Plans (ESOPs) & Employee-Owned Cooperatives

John Logue and Bill McIntyre and the staff of the Ohio Employee Ownership Center and the Cooperative Development Center at Kent State University. 42 pp.

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IBSN 978-0-692-01261-1, (paperback) $15

If you are a business owner looking for an exit strategy that can provide you with:

  • significant tax savings
  • flexibility in how and when you exit the business
  • a chance to reward employees that helped you build the business

All while priming the company for future growth.

Then an employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) or worker-owned cooperative may be for you. This manual describes both strategies in non-technical, easy to understand language, and will help you to explore whether these two options are right for you.

Solidarity as a Business Model: A Multi-Stakeholder Cooperatives Manual

Authored by Margaret Lund for publication by of the Cooperative Development Center at Kent State University

Multi-stakeholder cooperatives (MSCs) are co-ops that formally allow for governance by representatives of two or more “stakeholder” groups within the same organization, including consumers, producers, workers, volunteers or general community supporters. Rather than being organized around a single class of members the way that most cooperatives are, multi-stakeholder cooperatives enjoy a heterogeneous membership base. The common mission that is the central organizing principle of a multi-stakeholder cooperative is also often more broad than the kind of mission statement needed to capture the interests of only a single stakeholder group, and will generally reflect the interdependence of interests of the multiple partners.

This manual explains the Multi-stakeholder cooperative model; provides examples through case studies; and more. This manual is available as a FREE download, Click here.

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